berlin program

Berlin Program

The German Studies Association has representatives involved in the selection process of this important program, which is open to GSA and non-GSA members. The Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies offers up to one year of research support at the Freie Universität Berlin and is open to scholars in all social science and humanities disciplines, including historians working on the period since the mid-18th century. The program accepts applications from U.S. and Canadian nationals, permanent or long-term residents. Applicants for a dissertation fellowship must be full-time graduate students at a North American university who have achieved ABD status by the time the proposed research stay in Berlin begins. Also eligible are U.S. and Canadian Ph.D.s who have received their doctorates within the past two calendar years.

For more information, please visit the Berlin Program's website.

DISORIENTATIONS/DESORIENTIERUNGEN

Once again, Europe and Germany are dealing with extraordinary political, economic, cultural, and administrative crises. Britain is leaving Europe. Other countries are also considering their own exit. There is potentially another global financial crisis on the horizon. Nationalism is on the rise throughout the region. The largest minority party in Germany’s parliament is now the neo-nationalist Alternative für Deutschland (AfD). The #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter movements have galvanized attention around sexual assault and racial violence.

And if these issues are not disorienting enough, there are the overarching challenges of global warming and immigration, and the European project itself is seriously at risk of disintegration. This list, by no means comprehensive, identifies some of the most important issues facing Germany and Europe politically, culturally or economically in the present moment.

Yet periods of cultural, social, political, and personal confusion often lead to opportunities for substantive reflection and even radical interventions into prevailing assumptions and norms. How do moments of upheaval create spaces for political and cultural engagement? How do disruptions, social anxieties, cultural conflicts, gender troubles, racial reflections, calls of conscience, transformations in technologies, and the indeterminacy of language allow for restructuring, aesthetic evolutions, even transformations in collective sensibilities? How could analyses of past moments of disorientation/Desorientierung shed light on those faced in contemporary society?

For its 8th annual summer workshop, the Berlin Program welcomes proposals from a wide variety of disciplinary practitioners, scholars and academics of various affiliations, engaged and active artists and makers, independent scholars and figures in cultural and political institutions to submit an abstract and to present on the ways in which disorientations/Desorientierungen help refigure disciplinary, social, cultural, political, historical, or personal identities and even reshape the role of academia itself.

APPLICATION & DEADLINE: Please submit one PDF file containing a 250-word abstract and a two-page CV by April 1, 2019 to bprogram[at]zedat.fu-berlin.de

FOR MORE DETAILS, see our Call for Papers.

THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Dr. Deborah Barton | Université de Montréal
Dr. Mark Cassell | Kent State University
Dr. Jeremy DeWaal | University of Exeter
Karin Goihl | Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin Program
Dr. Thomas O. Haakenson | California College of the Arts

Eligibility and Terms

The program accepts applications from U.S. and Canadian nationals, permanent and long-term residents. Applicants for a dissertation fellowship must be full-time graduate students enrolled at a North American university who have completed all coursework required for the Ph.D. and must have achieved ABD (all but dissertation) status by the time the proposed research stay in Berlin begins. Also eligible are U.S. and Canadian Ph.D.s who have received their doctorates within the past two calendar years. The Berlin Program is a residential program and provides between ten and twelve months of research support.

Academic Profile

The program offers a stimulating academic environment that combines excellent research opportunities at one of Germany’s most distinguished research universities with intellectual and cultural interaction. Our colloquium - run by distinguished scholars each semester - serves as a central meeting point for all fellows to share, discuss and support each other’s work. Essential to the program’s mission is our close cooperation with our North American partner, the German Studies Association – the largest professional association of scholars focused on German, Austrian, and Swiss history, literature, culture studies, political science, and economics. Each year, our Summer Workshop and the GSA Distinguished Lecture at the Freie Universität Berlin as well as our Alumni Panel at the GSA Annual Conference in the U.S. provide a forum for scholarly exchange and seek to strengthen ties between fellows, alumni and the academic community in Berlin and beyond.

Institutional Structure

The Berlin Program is based at the Freie Universität Berlin, one of the nation's leading research universities and two-time winner in the national competition for excellence in higher education. The program is funded and administered in close cooperation with our North American partner, the GSA. All fellows enjoy library privileges, access to faculty, IT services and program infrastructure. Through our multidisciplinary advisory committee of professors fellows have access to a unique network of experts and institutions in one of the densest and most innovative academic regions in Europe.

For further information, visit our website at http://www.fu-berlin.de/bprogram or send an email to bprogram@zedat.fu-berlin.de